I Just Ordered This Bad Thing.

The mold remediation of our home is just about complete. All active mold has been removed and affected areas have been patched, drywalled, painted, etc. All air ducts have been cleaned, and the entire house has been fogged to kill any remaining mold in the air and on surfaces, furniture, etc. The only wall to wall carpet we had was on the stairs, and that has been removed.

Now we are entering phase two, which is remediation of our clothes, bedding, etc. This task felt incredibly daunting to us, to the point of paralysis. As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, when you have mold in your home, it does not remain isolated to the place where it’s visible. Invisible spores are released into the air and circulate throughout your home. Which means every single thing you own is touched by mold to a certain degree. If you are healthy, this probably isn’t too much of a problem, but if you suffer from mold illness, commonly referred to as CIRS (Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome), any mold is a problem and needs to leave.

Since I am tired most of the time and suffer from brain fog a lot of the time, I became overwhelmed and more or less shut down any time we discussed dealing with our stuff. And for this reason, we have been lax on this front. And when I say “we” I mean “me” because I led the charge on inaction.

Thankfully, my husband is a man of action, and he decided we needed to get over ourselves and figure this out. Also thankfully, by “we” he meant “him”, as he could see I wasn’t getting anywhere. He got a bone in his teeth and went deep on research and developed an action plan based on an evidence-based mold remediation protocol developed by Dr. Close. You can learn about about it here.

This is what we (ok, mostly my husband) are doing:

  1. Post-remediation, my husband ran diffusers with an essential oil blend called Combat Blend for 24 hours in each room of the house in order to catch anything the remediators might have missed, or anything still lingering in the air, which can happen after remediation. This would also kill any mold on drapes, furniture, etc. He did this while I was away, as there was a chance the oil could give me a bad detox reaction, which unfortunately, it did when I returned home. It was severe, but that’s a story for a different time. My husband did the homework, so you don’t have to. This is the best diffuser, and this is the essential oil. For you Young Living essential oil people, this is equivalent to Thieves Blend, but less expensive. My husband purchased the diffusers and essential oil from Diffuser World. Cheesy name, I know, but they are extremely knowledgable about essential oils and mold remediation, and are very familiar with Dr. Close’s protocol.
  2. We add one ounce of a product called EC3 Laundry Additive to every load of laundry. EC3 is natural, non-toxic, and kills mold.
  3. Once per month, we will use EC3 Mold Solution Concentrate to spray down anything that can’t be washed: drapes, area rugs, bedding, throw blankets, plush furniture, dry clean only clothing, etc. The diffusing covered most of this, but we will hit it with EC3 on an ongoing basis for prevention.
  4. We ordered this 100% organic, non-toxic mattress from a company called Avocado Green. I’ve never ordered a mattress in the mail, but it was rated number one by Consumer Reports, and there are literally thousands of very positive reviews on the website. Also, they have a very generous return policy — one year. This not an ad, by the way. Just sharing my rationale. I’m not going to lie, it was expensive by the time we added in the mattress pad, base, pillows, pillow covers, etc., but we decided it was worth it, as I spend a solid eight hours per day in bed. And we know our previous mattress has been in several houses with water damage (and therefore mold), so we decided it had to go.
  5. Since I was diagnosed with CIRS about a year ago, we have run air purifiers in every room of our home, and will continue to do so. There are many air purifiers in many price ranges. My husband researched this heavily, and settled on a brand called Blueair. We do the product line called Blue. You need different sizes based on the sizes of your rooms. My husband decided on Blueair because it got good ratings, and was middle of the road price-wise.
  6. My husband changes our air duct filters every 30 days whether they look dirty or not.
  7. We are going to institute an ongoing schedule for diffusing essential oils. Dr. Close recommends eight hours per room once a month, but we will need to figure out how to make that happen now that we know it makes me temporarily sick.

Ugh.

What a process, right? But for the first time since I was diagnosed, I feel like we have a handle on how to keep our environment safe for me, and I can only hope it leads to more healing than I’ve experienced in the past year, which frankly, hasn’t been that productive. More on that later.

In the meantime, I’m going to kick back and enjoy our clean home and air.

This is a Problem.

Before I start on the topic at hand, can I just say it seems somewhat ridiculous to be writing this blog in the midst of the pandemic. I am literally overwhelmed by the daily devastation, and in that light, my health problems seem irrelevant.

But the fact of the matter is I’m sick, and if you’re reading this you probably are too, so we have to keep moving forward, pandemic or not.

About those photos. The first is the hallway that’s between my bedroom and office. And guess what was just discovered there? Yep, mold. In a large quantity. And the second photo is an air vent in my office. Mold was just discovered there too. So, the two places where I spend the most time. Nice, right?

We just moved to this house a few months ago, and we had it inspected for mold by three different people prior to moving in, and nothing was found. Then we started our mold best practices practically from day one — air purifiers in every room, changing the air filters every 30 days whether they look like they need it or not. And of course, I was on my routine of taking mold binders, going to the sauna, etc.

But a month after moving, my mold blood marker called C4a became elevated to nearly double to what it was prior to moving. If you’re a numbers person, anything above 2830 is elevated. Mine’s at 5400. It has been as high as 8300, but was down to 1900 prior to moving. I also have been feeling worse than usual lately, so something is definitely up.

To that end, we had two more mold inspectors crawl all over the house, and between the two of them, they found the smoking guns. The ones I already mentioned, and a basement ceiling, which happens to be below the room where I spend a lot of time during the day. How am I doing?

So, we need to remediate, which is no small process. Dealing with the air vents and ceilings is the easy part. Dealing with our contents is the difficult and overwhelming part. What do I mean? Well, if you have mold in your house, it means you have mold in your air, which means you have mold on literally everything you own. Think about that for a minute.

As I look back, I realize all of the houses we’ve lived in for the past 15-plus years have had mold. That means furniture we have moved from house to house has also carried mold. My husband and I have known this for a while but have never gotten serious about dealing with it because it’s so incredibly overwhelming. It’s paralyzing. Seriously, think about it. Every book, every article of clothing, ever piece of furniture, every file folder, our computers. Mold. Mold. Mold.

Our rationale in the past has been that we’ll just get the house mold-free and hope that’s enough. Well, I have been treated for CIRS (mold illness) for nearly a year, and I’m literally no better, so we have to get more serious about our remediation.

When I think about what’s involved I become so overwhelmed I literally want to get rid of everything and start over. But that’s not very practical. So, we are going to do the best we can. Or, I should say, my husband and the remediators are going to do the best they can. Remediation stirs up mold, so I’m not supposed to be around while it’s happening.

So this is the loose plan. My daughter and I are going to leave for a couple of weeks. Not what I want to do during a pandemic, but I’m picking my poison. While we are gone, the remediators will fix the moldy areas, and then literally wipe down every single surface of our house from top to bottom. Every wall, every window and pane, every piece of woodwork, every hard piece of furniture, every piece of art, every bathroom, the kitchen, and every inch of the floor. Can you even imagine?

Then another team will take all the contents out of our basement, wipe them down and place them in clean plastic bins (in case they miss any mold) and bring them back inside. This process needs to take place outside because mold is released into the air during cleaning, and we don’t want that to happen inside.

If remediation is not done properly, the air in the home can actually be worse (i.e. contain more mold) than before remediation. So, remediators have to be selected and vetted very carefully, and we are working on that process now.

Needless to say, I am beside myself. This is going to be time consuming and expensive and involve staying in a rental home during a deadly viral outbreak.

This is the part of the post where I usually try to say something positive to put it all in perspective. I could do that, but I’d be faking it. Sure, there are worse problems, and I understand that. But this pretty much blows, and sometimes I just need to say that.

And now that I’ve said that, I can be a little more positive. It could be so much worse. There’s always something worse. I have food, clothing, shelter, love and faith. Life’s basics that so many people lack. And we have the ability to ride out the pandemic at home. So, while the mold situation isn’t what I would hope for, I really can’t complain.